Cowboy Bread

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#1
This is the cut down version of the recipe:

Cowboy Bread

3 cups flour
1 tsp. salt
1 1/8 tsp. baking soda
2 3/8 tsp. baking powder
2 3/8 tsp. cinnamon
7/8 tsp. nutmeg
3 cups brown sugar
1 1/3 cups shortening
4 large eggs
4 T. buttermilk

Mix all of the dry ingredients together. Set aside. Beat the brown sugar, shortening, and eggs together until fluffy. Mix in the dry ingredients alternately with the buttermilk, ending with the dry ingredients. Mix until just incorparated. Do not overmix. Pour into a 13x9x2 pan. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 25 to 30 minutes.
 

Dor

Active Member
#6
I am trying to get them organized and filed in Binders. I have been recyling sheet protectors I had bought for my job. I bought everything I had purchased home when I retired, so now I have lots of them to put my recipes in. The old recipes are the best. I wish my mother had kept more of my grandmothers recipes and I am getting as many of hers as I can. I asked her to give me her cookbooks and recipe cards when she no longer wants them. Since she is not living at home anymore I think she is going to do it. She likes it when I share her recipes.
 
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Mainegal

Super Moderator
Staff member
#7
Sure does sound yummy. I wish I had more of my grammie and great grammies recipes. My great grammie used to make molasses and sugar cookies that were thick and yummy. i've tried numerous old fashioned sugar cookie recipes trying to find hers and haven't yet.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#8
I have thought often about what it was probably like back in the days when the cattle were driven from Texas to the rail heads in Kansas and Nebraska. The menu on the trail was pretty meager and monotonous, I am sure. My guess is that breakfast and supper were the same things; biscuits, beans, and salt pork. Soldier's fare in the 19th century did include parched corn too, but it was still a spartan existence. I think it would have been a lucky cowboy indeed to have that cowboy bread listed above. Course, maybe it was developed for the little cowboys like I was when about 8 years old.
 
#9
Laurie, I have a recipe that I found for Molasses Ginger Cookies. They are really good. My husband loves gingerbread and he loves the cookies. I can post it if you would like.

Randy, I have watched a show on food network that was a contest on chuckwagon cooking. It was really good. I think that they really stepped it up from what they used to have. It was fun to watch though.
 
#10
My grandmother was an awesome cook and baker. She made the best Portuguese Sweet Bread and Portuguese Donuts, pan cakes and all sorts of Portuguese foods her mother had brought from Portugal. I asked her once if I could have copies of some of her recipes. She said, “They‘re all in my head, you know I don’t read and write to good.” So I asked; how do you measure things. She held up her old arthritic hands and said. ‘These are my measuring cups. My fingers are my measuring spoons but the most important thing is my eye.’ I tried to measure how much her hands held once but it never came out right. I didn’t have her eye.
I have been collecting recipe books since 1965. I like those sold as fund raisers by churches etc. They are full of old family recipes.
When my kids started to leave the nest and call for my recipes I realized except when I bake I was like my Grandma. I cook mostly by memory and by eye. I asked the kids which recipes they wanted and began measuring the ingredients I put in each dish. I wrote out dozens of recipes and added the favorites I’d collected over the years. I printed up a copy for each of my five kids. As their friends and families have seen the cookbook they have asked for copies. Just this week I was asked for a copy by the new bride of a young man who was my son’s high school classmate.
 
#11
That is how I cook most of the time too, Bernie. I made a book for my daughter 3 years ago. I use me hands to measure most of the time. When I bake it usually is a different story. I use measureing cups and spoons.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#12
Kim, that's a show I would love to see. We have a few old cookbooks here. Fiona has one that is both old and Amish. It also contains anecdotes which makes it interesting just to read through even if you aren't going to use a recipe. One of the things I found of interest was the number of pies they baked in a week. But pie was also part of their breakfast and when you think about it, it makes sense. The pies are loaded with fruit, sugar, and fat. Then those guys go out and walk behind a team of horses or swing a scythe. I can't say that I ever saw an overweight Amish person. I saw a movie that had Tim Allen in it and he tried to play an Amish farmer in this commumnity. His experiences with a huge draft horse were hilarious.
 

Mainegal

Super Moderator
Staff member
#13
Laurie, I have a recipe that I found for Molasses Ginger Cookies. They are really good. My husband loves gingerbread and he loves the cookies. I can post it if you would like.
I would love to have it. Please post it in a seperate thread and I'll keep an eye out for it. Thanks

Fixed quote tag - Bob
 
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Dor

Active Member
#14
That is how I cook most of the time too, Bernie. I made a book for my daughter 3 years ago. I use me hands to measure most of the time. When I bake it usually is a different story. I use measureing cups and spoons.

When I cook, I measure with my hands too Kim. I have to estimate when I give or post my recipes. My cousin just called me about a recipe. She has to have everything exact and in order and that is not how I cook. I do measure when I bake. That is how my mother did when we grew up and how I learned to cook.
 
#15
And that my friends is why people say they can't get things to taste as good as when you make it. LOL Like Grandma said the most important thing is the eye.
 

Mainegal

Super Moderator
Staff member
#17
some of my gram's recipes say lard the size of an egg, a pinch of this, a dash of that, etc
most of the old timers had the recipes in their head so there are no written recipes for them and it's a shame. sure wished i knew most were in their head when i was younger and they were alive, i would of had them write it down, my gr gram passed away when i was 19 and my gram when i was 45, so i was old enough to get recipes. i do have alot of my gram's recipes and her cook books
 

bob

Administrator
Staff member
#18
Another example of false advertising...

Not a single cowboy in the recipe!

I just checked the ingredients on my Girl Scout Cookies and they're not made with Girl Scouts either...

Boy, I'm glad you folks aren't in charge of Chocolate Chip Cookie recipes! ;)



On a more serious note, for some reason I would have guessed that there would be some molasses in there, but I'm no chef by any stretch of the imagination....
 
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Mainegal

Super Moderator
Staff member
#19
Another example of false advertising...

Not a single cowboy in the recipe!

I just checked the ingredients on my Girl Scout Cookies and they're not made with Girl Scouts either...

Boy, I'm glad you guys aren't in charge of Chocolate Chip Cookie recipes! ;)
Bob
LMAO We can always count on your to come up with something wise.....LOL :p:D
 
#20
How hilarious, Bob.

Randy, one time I was cooking and my daughter was in the kitchen with me. She saw me measureing in my hand. I think I was making cornbread, LOL. She said to me, mom how do you know that is 1 teaspoon. I held out my hand and showed her how I it and pour in the ingredient. She was so amazed. A few days later she wated to make something and I was watching her, she did not know it. I caught her cupping her hand to measure the ingredient, LOL. She turned to me and said, "it works"!!

I used to watch my grandma make dumplings. She made the roll out kind, more like a thick soft noodle. The kind I love! I loved how she would cut the strips of dough and hang them over her arm ,and break them off into the pot of boiling chicken broth. I can see it now.

Laurie, I will get the recipe out. I will post it soon.
 


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