help with getting petunias & impatiens started

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#1
I have tried for 2 years with no luck to get them to grow from seeds. Are they hard to do or is it just me? I have tried putting them in dirt, on top of the dirt, in bags w/ a wet napkin and still they just will not start growing. or they come up so far and fall over and die on me, Any help would be great. I hate buying them and would be easier for my green house business if I could grow my own.. Thanks any and everyone. Karen.
 
#2
Both on top of the dirt, they need light to germinate. Keep them close(3 or4") to any flourescent bulb thats on at least 10 hours a day, propagation mat would be helpful, but not necessary if the temp is around 65 degrees 24/7 in the area you have them. You could cover them wiith plastic wrap so they wont dry out. Good Luck
 

Jade

New Member
#4
They are tough to get going, I have worked at several large wholesale growers and we always bought the plugs in. I think that they need special attention with fungicides and growth regulators. We thought that it was more economical to buy them in. Impatien seeds are way expensive from my experience. Sometimes it is best to buy from the experts.
 
#5
Last year a bought the plugs and they worked great, just was trying to do them myself, but i guess getting the plugs for me makes more sense.
 

Jade

New Member
#6
Sometimes it makes more sense to get them from the guys that do it for a living. I went to college with a guy who works for Kube Pak, he has been trying to get me to work there for 25 years, and calls every 6 months to see if I want a job. They are experts in plugs. I was to visit the site quite a few years ago, they know what they are doing, for sure. Growing the difficult stuff is a science.
 
K

Kale

Guest
#7
I have not seriously tried growing them.
Just a few thoughts.
Have you tried starting in vermiculte to get a great root system, then placing in the little pots? Or perlite at least on the top layer or teas to keep them strong and fight off any fungi that may be the reason. Watering from the bottom?
Correct temps? And wash your hands before touching babies. Even some soaps /cleaners are too strong for them I'm sure.The no water hand wash stuff I'm guessing would shock them, it sure tears my hands apart, cant use it, ever.

I would put the lighting 2-4" away and as they grow give more space between the light and plants two 40 watt florescent 2inches away is what I do.

my4cents*lol
Kale:)
 
#8
I grow petunias from seed every year, they're very simple. You can use a regular seed starting mix in pots or the little peat pellets you can get at most stores in the spring. Moisten the seed starting mix or pellets first, then sprinkle the seeds on top. Don't cover them, and only bottom water if needed. Put them under florescent lights or where they'll get direct sun. If you go with the florescent lights, no need to get special plant bulbs or high intensity lights of any sort, a cheap shop light works just fine. Keep them where the temperatures will stay about 60, and you'll have sprouts in no time.

I have Laura Bush Petunias, both regular and pink, old timey or vining petunias, and some hybrids from Twilley Seed company growing right now. The hybrids are the first time I've ever used pelleted seed, but they're coming along just fine.

I've only grown impatiens from seed a few times, but I don't remember them being difficult. I'll check my notes when I get home, if you'd like. My mother has impatiens that reseed themselves every year, and I've gathered a few seeds from hers that I intend to just scatter in part of the garden every spring.
 
#9
sounds like you all have great luck with them I planted about 50 seeds and only 5 are still growing, now that the green house is going maybe I'll try again just sprinkle some on top of dirt and see how they do. Thanks everyone, I really like all the information I get on this site.
 
#10
I bought a dollar pack of impatien seeds from Lowes this year and planted them just slightly 1/8" below the surface of the soil. I had nearly 100% germination. I sowed them indoors a few weeks before the last expected frost and moved them to my cold frame after they had a few sets of leaves.
I think the key is hitting a good temp range and using high quality soil. I use metromix which is made from composted bark, coconut shells, and sphagnum moss. Its about $15 a bag, but is great for starting seeds. It drains quickly but remains moist for a good long while. They are all blooming now and a foot or so tall.
 


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