Just someting to check out

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Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#8
I really though it was pretty cool. You know how species of plants are being lost every day to global distruction, this seemd like a way to preserve for the future even if this is not the root of their intent. And what better place than somewhere that is untouched by most accounts
 

lynpenny

Super Moderator
Staff member
#9
this is interesting. I know there have been finds of seeds that were stored in jars in the middle east that were found after a thousand years or so that the seeds were viable still. It could be valuable in the future.
 
#10
One of the examples that I read that explained the need for an isolated seed bank was from Iraq. There was a seed bank in Abu Ghraib, of all places, that was looted after the war began there. Luckily the botanists who maintained the seed bank had sent samples of all their seeds to Syria in the 90's, so all is not lost. Syria is not the most stable of places though, so you can see where having a seed vault in an isolated area of politically stable nation is a good idea.

One of the reasons behind saving old varieties of crops and plants is that if a new disease appears, the genetic flexibility to resist the disease might lie in those old varieties. Corn is an example that was given to me as a very vulnerable crop because so much of its genetic variability has already been lost.
 


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