Lacewings?

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Jade

New Member
#1
I was into my favorite garden center on Saturday and had a big chat with the guy in charge. I thought that my azaleas had spidermite last summer. With the milder winters here I doubted that the low winter temps would kill them off. He told me that the most likely damage was from lacewings and not spidermites. This was news to me. Does anyone have the solution to kill off these bad boys? I love this garden center, they are all as geeky as me with their expertise. Apparently the lacewings start their feeding around June 4th and that is the time to start attacking them. I prefer a systemic control, as it is hard to spray young shrubs and cover the entire undersides of the leaves.
Please share any knowledge you have.
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#2
Welcome Jade!
Hmmm. Not something I have ever heard of as far as plant distruction. I do know they are beneficial insects eating on bad bugs. Unless there is something I don't know about.You can use lacewings to control aphids. I have purchased egg sacks for my garden.
Just to make sure I am offering good advice I did a quick search and have attached a link to back my post. You may have misunderstood what your garden guy said maybe he said you should get lacewings for the aphids. Anyway check out this link I actually learned a few new things. Let me know what you think.




http://http://www.bumblebee.org/invertebrates/Neuroptera.htm
 

Flower4Yeshua

Super Moderator & vegemm
Staff member
#3
It was my understanding that the green laceings were good for feed on aphids, small worms, insect eggs, mites, thrips, immature whitefly, and other insects....and a good thing to have....so I always thought they were a beneficial insect...here is a site I have with a bit more information...
http://www.thebeneficialinsectco.com/green-lacewing-larvae.htm
I will be interested in watching this thread to learn more...
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#5
Debe,
LOL!! Hey at least we are on the same thought line. I was taken aback by the comment from the garden guy. I started questioning myself that's why I pulled a link;)
 

Flower4Yeshua

Super Moderator & vegemm
Staff member
#6
same here dear....I had to double look at my information...as I have odered and use them before...but the bain is not wahat it use to be...
 

Jade

New Member
#7
Hmm, I am sure that he told me lacewings, but after the age of 40 the brain turns to arroz con frijoles, rice with beans. I will have to do further investigation.
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
#9
Lacewings do not just eat aphids, but spider mites and other sucking insects!
There larval state is very much the same as Lady Bugs and have the same voracious appetite!
Lacewings are such a graceful insect when in flight!
 
#10
It was my understanding that the green laceings were good for feed on aphids, small worms, insect eggs, mites, thrips, immature whitefly, and other insects....and a good thing to have....so I always thought they were a beneficial insect...here is a site I have with a bit more information...
http://www.thebeneficialinsectco.com/green-lacewing-larvae.htm
I will be interested in watching this thread to learn more...
Here's another site with a wealth of information about all sorts of beneficial insects: http://www.gardeninsects.com/index.asp

One thing you all should know is that if you have any interest in luring hummingbirds to your garden, make sure that you don't have any praying mantis' around. A praying mantis is the biggest predatory threat to hummingbirds and it can swallow a hummer all at once.
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#11
Here's another site with a wealth of information about all sorts of beneficial insects: http://www.gardeninsects.com/index.asp

One thing you all should know is that if you have any interest in luring hummingbirds to your garden, make sure that you don't have any praying mantis' around. A praying mantis is the biggest predatory threat to hummingbirds and it can swallow a hummer all at once.
Wow! Had no Idea.
 
K

Kale

Guest
#12
Yes, According to my understanding, the Mantis can catch a Hummer.
One was said to be witnessed in PA.

The idea is to (at best) keep a food supply for the Mantis in a distant location away from the hummers feeders and plants.

Try to keep the hummers feeders airborne in the middle of nowhere like on a line where they can see everything and where a mantis won't hang out.
My Mantis are usually found any time in the same location I put them.
I have my feeders where there is clear view for them to see a mantis. Although, the Mantis’ have good hiding techniques. I'm quite sure the hummer has a better eye to spot them and knows to do so.
I do and I will spot Preying Mantis’ nearly every single time I look, which is very often, to make sure the coast is clear for the hummers.
Keep in mind, Hummers eat lots of insects and bees that we need and enjoy.
You need to supply all their (the garden workers) needs with food to protect them all!!
So there you have the chain of life, everyone has their friend and enemy in the garden.

OH...*lol Where ever did you read that? I don't believe the Preying Mantis is the biggest thread to the Hummers and there is no way possible for them to swallow a hummer all at once! Consume most perhaps, but not at once.
Where ever did you read that? They do not have snake mouths *lol ...And if you have ever observed a Mantis eating his/her prey you will see they eat nearly as slow as a sloth!
Catch them rather quickly, but then just sit there and munch forever.
Please lead me to your writer...*lol!

I read some of the Mantis’ write up (from the link) there were many untruths!
Not based on any fact whatsoever! I guess the reader tried, but needs to research before writing information like that, as if they knew what they were talking about.

**** Always read more about a subject; one is limited to their own knowledge when writing and needs to get facts by reading more. Seeing documentaries and breeding/ raising them. Then one can own some facts! Please don’t believe all you read from one source! Any source…. unless you have trust in the author because they presented information that you have researched and proven to be based on facts.
Also some beneficials are not good for all Gardens

(Family Pieridae) (Peiris Genuc type)
Cabbage Butterfly or Small Cabbage White (The Imported Cabbage)
(known and described as the Diamond Back Moth (butterfly) will do a devastation to my small crop and yet farmers can use them to rid weeds from their land that attract pests that eat their crops.
Research a little ..some lacewings are said to be plant eaters just like Katydids.
Know your species.


BTW after the age of 40!*LOL:eek::eek:
May it never be, 69-75yrs old "maybe"... but 40...No Way! *LOL


Kale :)
 
#15
I just saw a show on Praying Mantis the night before last. there are many spieces of the Mantis and some are pretty big. The big ones looked like nothing I have seen and they showed one eating a snake. It was said that the Mantis could eat a 6 inch snake, but then again the mantis was not like anything I have ever seen. They said that a lot of our fictional space men are based on the facial looks of the praying mantis
 
#16
Yes, According to my understanding, the Mantis can catch a Hummer.
One was said to be witnessed in PA.

The idea is to (at best) keep a food supply for the Mantis in a distant location away from the hummers feeders and plants.

Try to keep the hummers feeders airborne in the middle of nowhere like on a line where they can see everything and where a mantis won't hang out.
My Mantis are usually found any time in the same location I put them.
I have my feeders where there is clear view for them to see a mantis. Although, the Mantis’ have good hiding techniques. I'm quite sure the hummer has a better eye to spot them and knows to do so.
I do and I will spot Preying Mantis’ nearly every single time I look, which is very often, to make sure the coast is clear for the hummers.
Keep in mind, Hummers eat lots of insects and bees that we need and enjoy.
You need to supply all their (the garden workers) needs with food to protect them all!!
So there you have the chain of life, everyone has their friend and enemy in the garden.

OH...*lol Where ever did you read that? I don't believe the Preying Mantis is the biggest thread to the Hummers and there is no way possible for them to swallow a hummer all at once! Consume most perhaps, but not at once.
Where ever did you read that? They do not have snake mouths *lol ...And if you have ever observed a Mantis eating his/her prey you will see they eat nearly as slow as a sloth!
Catch them rather quickly, but then just sit there and munch forever.
Please lead me to your writer...*lol!

I read some of the Mantis’ write up (from the link) there were many untruths!
Not based on any fact whatsoever! I guess the reader tried, but needs to research before writing information like that, as if they knew what they were talking about.

**** Always read more about a subject; one is limited to their own knowledge when writing and needs to get facts by reading more. Seeing documentaries and breeding/ raising them. Then one can own some facts! Please don’t believe all you read from one source! Any source…. unless you have trust in the author because they presented information that you have researched and proven to be based on facts.
Also some beneficials are not good for all Gardens

(Family Pieridae) (Peiris Genuc type)
Cabbage Butterfly or Small Cabbage White (The Imported Cabbage)
(known and described as the Diamond Back Moth (butterfly) will do a devastation to my small crop and yet farmers can use them to rid weeds from their land that attract pests that eat their crops.
Research a little ..some lacewings are said to be plant eaters just like Katydids.
Know your species.


BTW after the age of 40!*LOL:eek::eek:
May it never be, 69-75yrs old "maybe"... but 40...No Way! *LOL


Kale :)
Check out this site for all sorts of info on beneficial bugs. http://www.gardeninsects.com

I'll look for that info on praying mantis' for you!
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#18
My hummer feeders are hanging in open air but I have Hibiscus that they love. The Mantis I have seen are not very big but now you have me looking more closely!
 
K

Kale

Guest
#19
Yes Debe',there are different lacewings indeed!
Some you dont want to eat your plant life and some a farmer would plant flowers etc as bait away from crops*:D!
I was floored when learned a tiny bit about about nemotodes!!! It may work good for one gardener and destroy another's !


How long are your Mantis life cycle Crabber!?
And do the camouflage*LOL!?
Are yours cute like mine?

Kale:)
 


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