Rooting rose cuttings

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R

RiverRock

Guest
#1
I was just wondering is it possible to root rose cuttings in water or does it need to be done a special way?

RR
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
#2
Not in water!
There are several ways o root rose cuttings. The best is to take a good 6" cutting and insert it into either a pot of good quality potting mix! Then cover the cutting with a large size mason jar. Water cutting and place it somewhere that receives some morning sun.
Make sure there is at least one node (where the leaf is attached to the stem) is a few inches below the soil surface. Remove the leaf before inserting it into the soil, but leave the top ones!.
The second method is to prepare a spot in the garden.
Add lots of organic matter such as compost, well aged manure and peat moss, work this into the soil! Pat the area down to help settle the soil then water it.
Insert the cuttings ( I usually do several just to make sure you get at least one cutting roots...you can always give the others away) the same as in a pot with the node below the soil surface. Then cover the cuttings with mason jars (a gallon size works best!).
Keep the soil moist during the rooting period.
Rooting usually occures in a few weeks, to a few months, so you will need to be patient!
You will know something is happening if the cuttings send up new growth.
To be sure, you can give the cutting a gentle tug, if it resists, that means the cutting is rooted.
Leave then where they are over the next winter still covered with the glass jars. Next spring you can move them where you want them to grow!
 

Kya D

Active Member
#3
Ron great suggestions.
I accidentally rooted a few blaze rose cuttings by pushing 8 or so cuttings into a pot as I walked by. Three rooted I was really surprised
 
K

Kale

Guest
#4
I was just wondering is it possible to root rose cuttings in water or does it need to be done a special way?

RR
Here you go. Some info on rooting in water.
I thought I sent you this... or posted elsewhere...Just in case....

I know it is here...
http://gregnmary.gotdns.com:8080/index.php/topic,52.0.html

Rooted several but lost tack of them ... I will try again come Feb.
They are a hit and miss and need special tending & monitoring. Which is a key.

Kale:)
 
#5
I pruned my ht roses this past fall: treated a few to rooting hormone and placed them in planters. A few of those cuttings that were directly shoved into the ground this past fall NOW have leaves. The cuttings placed indoors, however: under a plastic bottle and in a planter ..... leafed out, but promptly died. I did have some luck with a wild rose cutting, but I moved it too soon and it, too died. I plan to leave any rose cuttings in place for a year or more this time! Wish me luck!
 

Flower4Yeshua

Super Moderator & vegemm
Staff member
#6
I had the same trouble when I tried to transplant first year of starting the roses...now I always wait at least two years
 

Gloria

Super Moderator
Staff member
#7
I can't wait that long! LOL.
I'll take the chance..I've only rooted and transplanted a very few but had luck with most of them.
 

tonya

New Member
#8
i have finally found a yellow knock out rose called "Radsunny". last year i found some pink ones with yellow along the edges but i really wanted a yellow one...this guy will get moved to the new backyard flower bed in the sunniest spot, the shadier spot will be home to a "Cityline Rio" hydrangea, lime green with bluish lavender edges, i hope these guys will be good companions...we will see:)
 
#9
I love knock out roses i have the red .I borrowed a few tiny limb's off a bush at a resturant last summer.Their almost two ft.tall now.Going to borrow a few more cutting from somewhere LOL.Very easy to root those.:)Have never seen the yellow though but will look now.
 
#10
Rooting rose cuttings have a reputation for being a bit challenging, that's true. But there is good news, rooting these cuttings can be a successful endeavor if you have the perseverance in growing your very own. Roses are well loved flowers the world over and just from cuttings, you may be able to multiply them into inspiring flowering plants.
 


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