Strawberry Butter

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Dale

Super Moderator
Staff member
#1
2 sticks butter, softened
1 c. confectioners sugar
1 pint hulled fresh strawberries (or more)

With food processor or blender mix all ingredients until smooth. Cover and refrigerate.

Note: Great with bran muffins, pancakes, toast, French toast, bagel, or biscuits.
 

Dale

Super Moderator
Staff member
#8
When the fresh strawberries are in, I plan to substitute Clabber Girl sugar alternative instead of confection sugar. Will post how it does.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#10
Buttermilk Sourdough Biscuits

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
½ tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
½ cup butter (softened)
½ cup buttermilk
1 cup sourdough starter
melted butter

Sift the dry ingredients into a mixing bowl. Melt the butter in a small saucepan and when melted, add the buttermilk. That cools the butter down some before adding to the sourdough starter. Add the butter/buttermilk mixture to the sourdough starter and mix well. Then add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients. I use a Kitchenaid mixer with a dough hook, so I let that do the kneading for me. If the dough is too sticky to start cleaning the sides of the mixing bowl, I add flour slowly until I get the dough right. Turn out onto floured work surface and roll dough until it is about 1/2" or a little thicker depending on how thick you want your biscuits. Cut biscuits with a glass or cutter with edge floured to release the biscuits. Place in a slightly greased baking pan, biscuits touching. Brush tops with melted butter. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes. Bake in a 425 degree oven for 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown.

Our oven must run a bit cooler than the indicated setting too and I bake the biscuits for 20 minutes. But I also make a double batch, so that probably affects the baking time also. I have been using the same starter for about 15 to 20 years now. The night before I want to make the biscuits, I take some starter, about a half cup or so, and add it into a bowl with a cup of flour (more or less) and add enough water to make it the consistency of moderately thick soup. I make it a bit fluid so the bubbles formed will break instead of growing and overflowing the bowl. The next day, I return enough starter to the starter container to make up for what I took out and use the balance for the biscuit recipe.
 
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Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#12
There's no such thing as a stupid question. The use of a sourdough starter is an old way to add leavening (wild yeast) into bread products. Using sourdough involves a little more planning than conventional cooking, but I don't think that is a handicap. There are ways to make up your own sourdough starter, but one of the easiest is to get it from someone who already has some. I have some dried flakes of my sourdough starter in the freezer, and if I ever lose my starter for whatever reason, I can start a new batch with one of those flakes. It just takes the flake, some water, and about a tablespoon of flour in a cup or small bowl. Stir it occasionally and keep it covered in a warm place. The kitchen counter is probably just fine. I use just a saucer as a cover as it shouldn't be air tight. It can take two or three days before the wild yeast starts to work again and bubbles will start to form (carbon dioxide). Once that happens, you probably want to use a larger container and add some more flour and some more water. My starter container in the refrigerator holds at least a pint, maybe a bit more. But if you like waffles or pancakes, you will never taste better ones that they are when made with sourdough. I also have a disc with sourdough recipes, and a piece written by my brother on the care of your starter. So if you want to make some of the best biscuits you ever tasted, give me your address by PM or something and I will send you some stuff. The starter I have originally came from a very well known San Francisco bakery that is now just a memory. But the starter is still working.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#15
Crabber, I can still play with this stuff, but I don't have to eat it. I am still falling slowly. I have lost 46 pounds in the last 14 months.
 
#16
Crabber, I can still play with this stuff, but I don't have to eat it. I am still falling slowly. I have lost 46 pounds in the last 14 months.
Hey Randy, Good for you!!! I am a diebetic, (not bad) but I have high blood pressure and high cholesterol. I have to watch it!!! I weigh in in the morning. :eek:
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#17
I am too, Kim. But I have to say that the diagnosis last year (2007) has actually been good for me. It got my attention and I am really having no trouble controlling my blood/glucose levels. I am on target between 85 and 90% of the time. I set a goal for myself to lose 60 pounds and I'm still working toward that, but have lost 46 pounds of it.
 

Dale

Super Moderator
Staff member
#18
Randy I am so proud of you taking control of your health back in 2007. My husband has been a diabetic for 17+ years and it's a struggle every day to keep his blood sugar levels under control. He takes Byetta along with insulin twice a day and keeps it under control mostly. His blood sugar reading this morning was 98. Diabetes is a journey all by it's it's self and you take it one day at a time.
 

Prowl

New Member
#19
2 sticks butter, softened
1 c. confectioners sugar
1 pint hulled fresh strawberries (or more)

With food processor or blender mix all ingredients until smooth. Cover and refrigerate.

Note: Great with bran muffins, pancakes, toast, French toast, bagel, or biscuits.
Question... What would you class as a *Stick* of Butter?
Thanks
PS
Please Remmber that I'm in England... :eek:
 

Dale

Super Moderator
Staff member
#20
Prowl I do apologize, a "stick" of butter is a 1/4 pound of butter. We are basically an interantional group and I should have posted the word that everyone would recognize. I'll try to do better!!!!
 


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