What do you plant in containers?

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#61
Kim you are not a pest. I'm happy to help if I'm able.
I am not sure how you plan to use the edging. I am assuming the boxes are open to the ground on the bottoms. Is the water running out from under the box or through the cracks on the sides?
If they weren't already planted I'd suggest you line the boxes with some sort of plastic. Trash bags or like I did the cheap $1 store tarps would be inexpensive. Cut them to fit and over lap where needed. I would lay it so 4 to 6 inches would be flat on the bottom and bring the rest up the sides. The weight of the soil should keep it in place and stop the water from running out. I am also wondering if your soil is to light to absorb and hold the water. Potting soil sounds to light for such a big container maybe more compost would help.
Still wondering how you plan to use the edging. Sorry it may be a great idea but I just can't picture it.
Hey Bernie, I got Rich to put in my other bed. He made it a little taller and dug down and put it in the ground a little. I think it is going to work great! :)
 
#62
Well, I've always loved container gardening. We grow almost everthing in containers, including all of our vegetables! Here's a pic looking toward my back stairs, with all my containers. We've gotten off to a great start this year, mostly due to hubby being off work for just over half a year due to the economic downturn. Every cloud has a silver lining right?! lol... my peas and radishes are sprouted, I have lettuce plants and swiss chard and spinach plants doing great. Tomatoe plants are in their large buckets in the greenhouse and have grown so much in the last few warm days! I've been getting all my containers in my front yard that I fill with annuals ready as well, and can't wait to put in my impatience, begonias, and fuschias.
 

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Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#63
Janet,
What a paradise walk! Very nice.

I have my upside down tomatoe and all my house plants (tropicals). They are now outside on the decks and recovering from being inside for the winter. I am getting way to old to haul those huge pots in and out. But I will never give that up.
I just planted 6 hab peppers in a pot to keep them from the sweet peppers in the garden and my daughters dog ate every one. I guess it was the fresh soil that made her dig through the pot. So now I start over.
 

Kya D

Active Member
#65
I bought some peonies, hostas, and other perennials last week when it was warm and beautiful, this week it is snowing and very cold, so all of my perennials are in containers in the house, Not really where I wanted them but they are just growing like crazy.
They will probably stay there until the end of May now.
 
#66
Janet,
What a paradise walk! Very nice.

I have my upside down tomatoe and all my house plants (tropicals). They are now outside on the decks and recovering from being inside for the winter. I am getting way to old to haul those huge pots in and out. But I will never give that up.
I just planted 6 hab peppers in a pot to keep them from the sweet peppers in the garden and my daughters dog ate every one. I guess it was the fresh soil that made her dig through the pot. So now I start over.
Oh Crabbergirl! hubby has been going on and on at me about doing upside down tomatoes! can you explain what type of container it is, and what type of plant? did you keep it inside all winter? did it produce tomatoes all winter?
I really cut back on how many things I bring in and out of the house for winter. This past winter was one of the longest, coldest, most snowy we have ever had! so anything outside that survived that is growing away and the rest is compost! hubby and I both have degenerative disk disease badly and just can't keep doing it! The only think I kept was a collection of begonias in not very large pots. It's still to chilly at night for them to go out yet. :)
 

Dor

Active Member
#67
I grow lots of things in containers because of my clay soil, cannas, climbing lillies, orienpets, brugs, aloes, roses, donkey ears, irises, daylilies, bird of paradise, tomatoes, hot peppers, bell peppers, mexican petunia, ee's, and so many more I can't remember right now.
 
#68
I found your thread about upsidedown tomatoes Crabbergirl!
We have grown all our vegies in containers for years now. The only thing we have not done of course is pumpkin or squash. But we do zuchini! we are doing a big barrel with potatoes tomorrow, and sawdust...I'll let you know how it goes!
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#69
Janet,
I know what you mean about cutting down what you bring in for winter. I actually spent about $200. to temporarily close in one of my outside decks so I didn't have to bring in all those plants. Then of course I had to take it all down for spring!

There are a lot of commercial containers for sale to plant upside down tomatoes. But what I did was take one of my hanging baskets that I use fo my Staghorns and use it. I put the coconut shell basket in just like I was planting a fern then I poked a hole in the bottom and stuck my plant in upside down. Then filled with dirt. It has worked great so far, I have flowers! It stays drained and the container looks nice not like some plastic bag. This is the first one I have doen so it is a little wait and see. My goal is to be able to take them in and winter them over. I'll keep you posted.
I would post a pic but I am waiting on some hardware for my computer then I'll be happy to post a pic for you.

I have degenerative arthritis in my neck and spine so I totally understand.
 
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#70
I'd love to try the upside down tomato but we get such crazy winds here I wouldn't dare. I have to stake everything as it is. I hope it works well for everyone else.
 

Dor

Active Member
#71
Janet,
I know what you mean about cutting down what you bring in for winter. I actually spent about $200. to temporarily close in one of my outside decks so I didn't have to bring in all those plants. Then of course I had to take it all down for spring!

There are a lot of commercial containers for sale to plant upside down tomatoes. But what I did was take one of my hanging baskets that I use fo my Staghorns and use it. I put the coconut shell basket in just like I was planting a fern then I poked a hole in the bottom and stuck my plant in upside down. Then filled with dirt. It has worked great so far, I have flowers! It stays drained and the container looks nice not like some plastic bag. This is the first one I have doen so it is a little wait and see. My goal is to be able to take them in and winter them over. I'll keep you posted.
I would post a pic but I am waiting on some hardware for my computer then I'll be happy to post a pic for you.

I have degenerative arthritis in my neck and spine so I totally understand.

Nancie, I have 2 of those topsy turvy tomato planters but have a hard time keep the tops on them. I guess I will have to wire the top together once I get the potting soil in them. I think I will grow peppers in one and tomatoes in one. Wish me luck.
 
#72
Good Luck Dorothy!! :)
Can't wait to see pictures and hear reports on the upside down tomatoes.... I'll stick with the regular way this year, then try it for next years if you all have success! I'm still trying to decide for sure on what to put on my potatoes...straight sawdust, or mix it with dirt?
 

Dor

Active Member
#73
Thank you Janet. I am not trying potatoes yet. Maybe next year. I love sweet potatoes but not doing them this year either. I think those two will be two thing I grow next year. Let us know how it goes.
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#74
Dor & Janet
We should start a thread for this so we can see all the options for these plantings. I looked at the topsy turvy but I would rather spend the money on plants:p I thougt I should be able to work something out . Have you actually planted yet? Keep us posted. I think the wire will work good to keep your top on Dor. My pot is open just like a planter. Seems to be working well. I think maybe it may start to grow plants out of the top from the roots. My plant has turned up towards the sun.
 
#75
I started some New Big Dwarf tomatoes from seed, they're supposed to be good for containers; and I was debating putting one in the bottom and one in the top of those topsy turvy planters. I don't know if it will work, I haven't gotten the planter out of the box yet, but I think there should be plenty of root space.

Do those of you who have used one a topsy turvy planter think that might work?
 
#76
I have a friend who is growing tomatoes in hanging baskets for the first time. From the picture I think she'll be watering them every few hours in the summer heat. At least they won’t be falling out of the bottom. I just hope everyone gets lots of nice juicy tomatoes this year especially me. LOL
 

Dor

Active Member
#77
I started some New Big Dwarf tomatoes from seed, they're supposed to be good for containers; and I was debating putting one in the bottom and one in the top of those topsy turvy planters. I don't know if it will work, I haven't gotten the planter out of the box yet, but I think there should be plenty of root space.

Do those of you who have used one a topsy turvy planter think that might work?

Blue, the instructions says to put in two plants in the bottom. I am going to do that and see what happens. I hadn't thought about the top. It has a top coverning it so I don't thing it would work if you use the top.
 
#78
I started some New Big Dwarf tomatoes from seed, they're supposed to be good for containers; and I was debating putting one in the bottom and one in the top of those topsy turvy planters. I don't know if it will work, I haven't gotten the planter out of the box yet, but I think there should be plenty of root space.

Do those of you who have used one a topsy turvy planter think that might work?
Not a good idea. For one thing, the container isn't that big and your tomato plant is going to grow deep roots and they will take up all of the space in that container. If you tried to plant one in the top (and there isn't much of an opening so it would be harder than it is to water them,) you probably won't get any tomatoes because neither plant will get adequate nutrition.

You will need to water your plants every day. You will need to fertilize the plants at least once a month. Before you put the tomatoes in the planters, add some bone meal and lime to the soil. Container grown tomatoes lose calcium quickly because frequent watering leeches it out of the soil faster.
 

Kya D

Active Member
#79
Great info Ms. Susan Oh BTW my very first hummer showed up today while I was planting some of my veggies.
I am so excited
 


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