Cleanup before new lawn

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#1
I have about 3000sqft back yard area that I'm looking to prepare for, and plant, some tall fescue blend this spring - at least get started on a section or two to begin with.
Attached is what it looks like at the moment.
Just had 3 x 30-40' trees removed last week that had significant root sprawl - see second attachment.
So there is a higher than normal content of sawdust/wood chips mixed in in three large areas.
The grass that used to be there was a runner type -Bermuda, I think. So there are dead remains of that in some areas, and dead/live weeds to deal with.
If I rototill in the areas where the old/dead Bermuda grass and weeds is/were, is it actually better to leave the chopped up remains there as organic matter, or try to remove as much as possible?
Will the higher concentration of woody content in the areas where the trees were be a good thing, or bad thing?

Greg
 

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#2
I think I might've answered my own question...
Started tilling a section of it today, and during the tilling and leveling, it became more clear where to pull out old bermuda grass, and how to even things out with the wood chips, dead leaves, and soil to take it all in a more balanced kind of way. Off to get the seed and some feed for it now.

Greg
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
#3
Hi Greg, and welcome to our forum!
Funny, we all eventually figure out the best way to do things! It is a sign of a good gardener!
Bermuda grass has deep roots and will come up again if you do not get all the roots!
 
#4
new lawn

This is a little off topic from the original post, but it just clicked today while using my cool little dethatcher to try to get the grass seeds an inch or two into the soil.
In high school, I loved doing body work on my truck in Auto Shop - welding and bondo.
I can't say I was ever very good at it, but loved doing it anyways.

Initially, I looked at my landscaping with an eye towards the end result.
Landscaping and gardening really isn't about the end resuilt, is it...

Greg
 

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RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
#5
It really is the journey!
Cute long hair dachshund! I had one years ago that looked just like yours.
I like that fence, gives a nice backdrop for small trees, shrubs and vines.
 
#7
The pooch, Chipper, was actually my motivation to get working on the yard and get him some grass to romp in. The informal jungle was probably interesting for him, but just wasn't working when it came to frisbee time.
Neglected the yard for 7 years, and it showed.
Got the pooch from a foster/shelter, who had found him scared and homeless living under a bridge about a year and a half ago.
Wonderful little pooch that has motivated me to do many things I wouldn't have done otherwise.
Had him DNA tested... the foster/vet thought he was a spaniel mix.
Turns out he's part Pomeranian, part Lhasa Apso, traces of Rat Terrier, and traces of Fox Terrier. I would guess he may also be part Chow because of the 60% black tongue, but didn't show in the test results. Posted some videos of him at the beach last summer on youtube if interested. Search for 'chipper my pooch'. No longer scared or homeless...
 
#9
Seems pretty normal to me- it's typical to charge for a spring and fall cleanup and the monthly lawn bill is about right.

Fall cleanup is getting rid of leaves- quite the mess and it costs your lawn company money to get rid of them, don't forget. That's not all profit to them. Their overhead is included. Spring cleanup is getting rid of your neighbors leaves and debris that have blown onto your lawn and into your foundation plantings over the winter. It's also the branches, twigs, that will certainly fall on your lawn over the winter, plus rocks that migrate to the surface.

If you think the cost for the cleanup is too high and then call several other places. But do expect to pay - no one is trying to put something over on you, this is regular stuff.
 
#10
I was looking at getting a Shindaiwa power broom to speed up the cleanup process of thatching and aerating. Has anyone used this tool before? Does it really save that much time vs. raking? What about a Billy Goat lawn vac? Would that get filled too quickly, or is there any way of running a longer tube into a trailer?
Artificial Grass Suppliers
 


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