I require a little help

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#1
Hey i need some info about growing herbs in a house. I just need to know what are some small sized plants that i can grow in doors. :confused: Yea this one is a little bit tricky for me.
Thanks for the help.
 

Kya D

Active Member
#2
I would plant which ever ones that I would use the most.
I really like basil, oregano, and parsley but you might use others.
Some like dill could get out of hand.
I can't keep rosemary alive but some folks can.
 

curbhopper

Active Member
#6
Well, we have herb PLANTS in our produce aisle. So I always grow them. I have had this rosemary plant for MANY years! Dill is another plant I've had for many years. Herbs seem to like me. :) They're in planter boxes. Curbie
 

lynpenny

Super Moderator
Staff member
#7
You always see these little pots of plants in pictures in magazines. Most plants want more room for their roots and they grow big but if you use them a lot then they will be kept in check. I wouldn't put any herb in a pot less than 6 inches if I want to grow it for a long time. I'm blessed with living here in TX where I can grow most herbs year round. So I have them in a garden out off the deck. I have not had to have them in pots for a long time. Hope this helps.
 

curbhopper

Active Member
#8
Thanks Lyn ~ You know what I've had for years ~ shamrocks. My step-mother had a nack for African Violets ~ I can't grow one of those for love nor money. :)
 
#13
Growing herbs have a few requirements to meet their needs...
You want to start with a good soil that does not hold water,for thyme this condition is critical. Look for an easy drainage type of soil so that the herbs can dry out between waterings.
Then Warmth and lighting. Use a heating mat or heating sorce like a place in a sunny southside window. And a location that give lot of light or/and an area with an indoor growing light.

One will need to study which herb is suitable for growing for the conditions that they have to offer, for Herbs grow in more or less moisture and germinate from 5 days to one month all seem to like the temps from 60 to 70 degrees to germinate.
 
#15
Well I'm thinking of something in concideration with your basil growing, so why not a tea. Basil is a good companion with lemon balm and rose petals.
Lemon Balm or 'Melissa officinalis' have medicinal properties such as stuffiness from a cold, being known as a mild vasodilator. The parts that are used for tea are fresh leaves which give a better flavor.
Lemon Balm grows about 2' and is a perennial, in some northern temperate zones. It takes 14-21 days to germinate at 70 degrees.
Sow your seeds uncovered due to they needing light to germinate. One can just press the seeds onto the moist soil.
Lemon balm does tolerate both dry soil and light shade but bushier in full sun and a good supply of moisture. Lemon Balm can be directly sown outdoors. Where it will self sow freely, The young seedlings will need protection from heavy frost. The growth dies back in winter but reappears in spring.

The infusion is as follows:
1/4 cup of fresh leaves or 1 teaspoon dried in 1 cup of boiled water and let steep for 5-10 minutes or to taste.

It is difficult to determine which herb one should grow due to their interests of usage. For me it would be in the kitchen for culinary
 
#16
Shadylane,
How dry do you want the soil to get between waterings? I usually let it get pretty dry, but still moist to the touch. Should I let it go a little longer before waterings? Also, have you grown chamomile? I grew some two summers ago and five plants yielded a years worth of sleepy time tea. It was honestly one of the most rewarding gardening experiences because I love that stuff.
 
#17
Hello theanticlimactic, you are correct most herbs need excellent drainage. I have killed many by over watering. Take your finger tip and dig about 1/4 inch down in the soil. If you find that your soil is still moist that would be plenty of moisture till the next watering. When is the next watering? when that 1/4 inch down in the soil is dry. But again some herbs can with stand dry periods. It's all about knowing your herb of interest growing conditions.

The German Chamomile 'matricaria recutita' the 1-2 foot annual makes and is mostly used for good flavored tea. The Roman chamomile is used for the rock gardens and ground cover, and then there is the Chamaemelum nobile or 'Flore Pleno, which are dwarf and used as the edging plant with double flower heads. It is good advice to sow German Chamomile directly outdoors for if I can remember correctly they don't transplant well. But to answer your question if I have grown any the answer is no. It will be on the list to grow. I would like to grow herbs for teas in my garden this season.
 
#18
My absolute favorite herb is basil! Do you like to grow your herbs outside or in a sunny window? Chamomile is so popular with tea but what about spearmint and peppermint? Where do you get your seeds? Curbie
 

lynpenny

Super Moderator
Staff member
#19
Lowes that is where I get my seeds. I have grown chamomile and loved it. I picked the dried blooms and made tea but it does not go with one of my meds now so I haven't grown it in a few years. yes i make tea out of my mints. I like the spearmint over the peppermint.
 
#20
I love to grow herbs inside and out. My husband brought some sweet basil home from the grocery store and it was in a wrapper with roots intact. I just couldn't stand to waste the root system and planted it in a pot. I used it during the winter and them planted it outside in the spring. It grew and I cut it all summer and had a nice supply of dried basil. .

Try some sage, rosemary and chives. All do well inside and keep them cut. this makes them bush. I use lights in the winter to keep them from getting spindly.

I use a indoor potting mix with some compost for my indoor growing medium. It sterial and weed free. I also like to use a time release fertilizer (it comes in little round balls). Then I only have to add it every 5 to 6 weeks.

Have fun!
 


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