Canning and freezing recipes

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Jade

New Member
#1
With the summer season upon us I think that we should have a thread just for our favorite recipes. I have to dig out my favorite from last year...Peach Habanero pepper jam. Just thought I would get everybody thinking.
Today is defrost the big chest freezer, do jar inventory, and go thru recipes day for me. I am getting excited!!
 

Jade

New Member
#2
With the summer season upon us I think that we should have a thread just for our favorite recipes. I have to dig out my favorite from last year...Peach Habanero pepper jam. Just thought I would get everybody thinking.
Today is defrost the big chest freezer, do jar inventory, and go thru recipes day for me. I am getting excited!!
Peach Habanero Jam
Recipe #324849 | 1¼ hours | 45 min prep | add private note
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By: Buster's friend
Sep 12, 2008

First taste sweet golden warm summery peach with a hint of smokey spice... then warmth, then heat... just up to the point of concern... then subsiding back to mellow peachy goodness. On top of a cream cheese coated cracker (or even better, a PBJ on homemade buttermilk bread!), the heat is mellowed to a gentle "creeper" warm that sends them back for more... and more... and more. Adapted from the Ball No Sugar Needed cooked peach jam recipe. Try it, you'll like it. Seriously. This type of pectin gives a soft set - perfect for putting on cream cheese. I add a handful of red peppers to serve as a warning as the orange habaneros meld right in and are invisible. WEAR GLOVES. PUT A TOWEL DOWN AT YOUR WORKPLACE TO CATCH ANY SEEDS, ETC. DO NOT TOUCH FACE. Buttermilk soaked compress helps any burning areas that are inadvertently touched.
8 -9 1/2 pints (change servings and units)

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I was going to give this as Christmas and hostess gifts but hubby said I had to try it first. Well, now I don't want to give it away. Yum, I love sweet with heat.
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Ingredients
4 cups peaches, peeled and crushed (about 4 lbs)
1 cup habanero pepper, seeded and minced (about 25-30 peppers)
5 red peppers, coarsely seeded and chopped (cayenne, red jalapeno, etc)
1 cup unsweetened grape juice (white)
1/2 cup lemon juice (bottled)
1 tablespoon turmeric, ground
1/4 teaspoon butter (optional)
1 3/4 ounces ball fruit jell (No Sugar Needed Pectin)
3 1/2 cups unbleached cane sugar
2 tablespoons vanilla extract
Directions
1Peel, chop & crush peaches. Pulsing them in Cuisinart to a chunky consistency works well. Crushing with a potato masher works well too. Do not over process in food processor as cooking breaks them down too.
2WEARING GLOVES (seriously), split habaneros and remove seeds and most of pith holding seeds. Reserve the pith & seeds to add back to jam if it is not hot enough for your tastes (OMG).
3Split red peppers, de-seed & chop coarsely.
4Process habaneros and red peppers of choice to mince. Do not process until smooth, just a mince, finer than the peach chop.
5Measure 4 cups of peach crush and 1 cup pepper mince into a 6 to 8 quart nonreactive pot. Add the white grape juice, lemon juice, turmeric and butter (optional - but reduces foaming). Gradually stir in pectin. Bring to a full boil over med-high heat, stirring constantly.
6Add sugar. Return to a full boil and boil hard for 2 minutes.
7Remove from heat and stir in vanilla.
8Taste and decide whether you want to add some Habanero pith and/or seeds (not for me thanks and I like it hot!). Go easy though as you probably want an edible finished product.
9Ladle jam hot into freshly boiled half-pint jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe rims clean with a clean dish towel dipped in hot water if necessary so the lids will seal well. Adjust rings until resistance is just met.
10Load jars into boiling water bath, cover and process 10 minutes. Make sure jars are covered by at least 2 inches of water and water is gently boiling.
11After processing, remove jars and place on a towel to cool for 12 to 24 hours.
12Remove bands, wipe sealed jars with a cool damp cloth. Label and store in a dark, cool. dry place for up a year -- as if it be around that long!
 

Jade

New Member
#4
I found a few more that I want to try this year...just did my jar inventory, looks like I will need to get some more jelly jars. I give the majority away when we visit people for dinner and to family at Christmas.
If anyone wants the recipes just ask.
Blueberry lime jam
Christmas Jam
Hot Pepper garlic jelly
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#5
I do that too, Jade. I may have enough jars for this year though as I bought pretty heavily last year. I have people at the diabetes support group bringing me jars now too though. Some of those aren't usable though and they just go into recycling.
 
#6
Going after jars myself today. It's strawberry/rhubarb time here. Only have about 2 cases of jelly jars!!:eek: I usually get my supplies at the Amish store---they have the best prices around here. Am actually anxious to get started with my "jamming" this year!!!:confused::D
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#7
I did 7 cases of Marionberry Jam last year and with both girls away at college, there wasn't nearly as much consumed. I still have three cases left, so I will slack off on Marionberry this year. I will still do a couple of cases though and some strawberry.
 
#8
Got a good buy on my jelly jars (1c.)-- $6.00 @ case--at Wal-Mart no less!!!?? That was even cheaper than the Amish store! Whooda thunk it?
Got everything---guess now I have to get busy!:eek::D
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#9
I worked on cherries today. Friends from church gave me some from their tree and I made pie filling out of them.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#11
My granddaughter snagged one and ate it not realizing they were pie cherries and quite sour. But they sure taste great in a pie.
 

Jade

New Member
#12
I ordered a sleeve of reg. lids from Lehmans online....345 (approx) lids for about 44 bucks, I thought that was a bargain considering when I priced them at all of the stores around here they were going for over 2 bucks a dozen. I need to pick up some more jelly jars too...last year Walmart had them for 4 dollars per doz. Haven't looked for them yet, so I don't know how much they are going for this year.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#13
I think I have enough jars for this year and I have a good stock of lids on hand. But thank you for mentioning Lehmans for lids. That sounds like a good price.
 
#14
We are just learning to can. Always wanted to but never got down to it. I have been buying jars and lids. Just got the Ball Blue book today. Any suggestions from you pros for a newbie? We are planning on starting with pickles and then when our tom are ready (we have 100 tomato plants) planning on salsa, spag sauce, ketchup and whatever else we figure out. ANY advice would be appreciated. Take care
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#15
For pickles, I will defer to Crabber and Gloria. I am going to a pickle class on the 4th of August though and I should know more than I do now. I have made some pretty good bread and butter pickles, but my dill pickles left a lot to be desires. I have tasted Crabbers pickles and they are really good.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#16
I forgot to mention though, that I do know how to make salsa. There are some good recipes for salsa in the Ball Book and I use a couple of them. But the ones I use the most, I developed on my own. Some really good recipes have come out of that along with some that I would not bother with again.
 
#18
We ate some of my homemade canned tomato soup today in efforts to free up some pint jars for salsa. We are having Salsa Saturday here August 7th with my sister and family and a neighbor up the street and her hubby. I have 2 1/2 bushels of tomatoes on order and a half bushel of green peppers. I hope that they all get here early, as salsa is very time consuming with all of the chopping involved. When I was in my 20s we always made a weekend out of it, but I don't know if anyone is staying over this time or not. I always like to do 2 years worth of salsa at a time, but we will see how it goes. We will have a lot of cooks in the kitchen this year, thank goodness for a big kitchen. One of our prerequisites for our new home when we were shopping for one.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
#19
It usually takes me a couple of days to do a batch of salsa. I get all the ingredients chopped up and into the pot the first day and then cook and can it the second day. The second day is shorter than the first day. I make four gallons at a time.

I think the recipes in the book are good. I use three of them. One of them is called Jalapeno Salsa and it uses a 1 to 1 ratio of peppers to tomatoes which means it's pretty hot. I have substituted habaneros for the jalapenos too and that really makes a hot one. I have mailed CD's to those interested in the recipes though and could mail one to you if you like. Then I can discuss what your needs are and go from there. The recipes do have notes at the bottom and I have marked what I consider the best ones with stars.
 

Dor

Active Member
#20
Medium Hot salsa

Randy if you will sometime in the next day copy and past your recipe for the medium hot salsa for me. My cd that you sent me is stuck in my cd drive in my lap top and and I can't get it out. In the mean time I will just work on chopping my ingredients and getting everything together. I might have to take it in to the shop to get it worked on. I just feel like I am forgetting something. Do I need to boil and remove the skins from my tomatoes? lmk
 


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