Great Seed Starting Idea

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Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#1
I like this because it is
1.) Organic and
2.) inexpensive

Use egg shells to plant new starts in. I use only cage free orgainc eegs in compostable containers. When I crack my eggs I try to crack on end leaving a large bowl. I then place the empty shell back in the carton and fill it with a couple tablespoons of soil and add my seed. When the seedling is ready to be planted outside I simply lift the egg shell out of the carton and plant the whole egg shell and seedling in the ground. Saves buying peat pots and such and helps build your soil.

How do you do your starts?
 
#5
I like this because it is
1.) Organic and
2.) inexpensive

Use egg shells to plant new starts in. I use only cage free orgainc eegs in compostable containers. When I crack my eggs I try to crack on end leaving a large bowl. I then place the empty shell back in the carton and fill it with a couple tablespoons of soil and add my seed. When the seedling is ready to be planted outside I simply lift the egg shell out of the carton and plant the whole egg shell and seedling in the ground. Saves buying peat pots and such and helps build your soil.

How do you do your starts?
This is a very cool idea! They actually sell kits for herbs and other things with an egg shell, a small clay saucer, the seeds and the planting mix, and these kits aren't cheap! Your idea is better because it's FREE!
 

Wombat

Active Member
#6
Great idea Crabber! I usually just crush my shells up in the compost. I generally use cardboard egg cartons as they're perfect for seedlings and can be placed straight in the ground.
 

Mainegal

Super Moderator
Staff member
#8
I've used the egg shells before. When I planted them in the ground, I cracked the bottom of the shell so the roots would grow out.
Crabber do you crack the end of your shells? I wondered how the roots would break though the shells too Shiney and I'm not a blonde... LOL That is why I cracked them before planting. Anxious to see what Crabber does.
 
#9
I fill 4' square pots with jiffy mix seed starter, sprinkle the whole pack of seeds on top, cover with plastic wrap, rubberband it closed and put them on propagation mats in flats. When they sprout I move the babies individually into 6 packs and eventually into 4 " or 5" pots. Everything is done under cheap shop lights on shop shelves in my basement. My flats have no holes so everything is watered from the bottom, therefore no leaks. I like the egg shell idea, but I do way too many seeds to try that. I would think you would need to break the bottom of the egg shell as I've composted for more than 20 years and those egg shells take a long time to decompose.
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#11
I've used the egg shells before. When I planted them in the ground, I cracked the bottom of the shell so the roots would grow out.
Crabber do you crack the end of your shells? I wondered how the roots would break though the shells too Shiney and I'm not a blonde... LOL That is why I cracked them before planting. Anxious to see what Crabber does.
I guess I was having a moment. I do crush the shell a bit so that the roots can break out ok.
 

tonya

New Member
#12
does anyone plant the crushed egg shells under tomato seedlings to help prevent blossom end rot???i read that some where and thought i'd try it...
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#13
I compost everything so I have not specifically done thet. I do keep a lot of calcium in my soil which is the one thing that helps prevent end rot;)
Let use know how it works for you.

I do know crushed egg shells on the ground around your plants helps deter slugs and cut worms. It's the sharp edges
 

tonya

New Member
#15
egg shells

i have only had tomatoes for the last 2 years and although i did have a little blight last year it didn't take all of them out and the year before everything was great but then again it was a new plot...i think we get blossom end rot here regardless of whether we have adequate calcium in the soil b/c of our erratic rainfall...i did get my rainbarrell last year and will be hand watering in july&august which i didn't do last year:(i don't have a well and the city already gets enough of our money i don't dare use city water on my plants...
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
#17
i have only had tomatoes for the last 2 years and although i did have a little blight last year it didn't take all of them out and the year before everything was great but then again it was a new plot...i think we get blossom end rot here regardless of whether we have adequate calcium in the soil b/c of our erratic rainfall...i did get my rainbarrell last year and will be hand watering in july&august which i didn't do last year:(i don't have a well and the city already gets enough of our money i don't dare use city water on my plants...
One thing you may want to consider with your watering, is that watering the leaves and top watering of tomatoes can cause disease such as bilghts and viruses. When ever possible water only at ground level, NEVER water in the heat of the day and NEVER at night. Only water tomatoes ealry in the morning or in the afternoon when they can dry before night fall. I know that sounds like what I just said not to do but the key is keeping plant leaves dry at dusk ;) I use only soaker hoses under my mulch to water my tomatoes. Never a sprinkler that will wet the leaves
 
#18
Most people in the northeast that bought tomatoe seedlings last year ended up with tomatoe blight. it was something that came from the growers.
 
#19
I know that my tomatoes got the late blight and we ended up with almost no tomatoes. I am giving them another chance this year because I just love tomatoes and they are still expensive to buy locally unless I buy romas or seconds in half bushels for canning.
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
#20
Last year was a really bad year for growing tomatoes and other crops!
We had way too much rain which basicly rotted the tomatoes in the field!
This year looks to be a good year, now that we are under the influence of El Nino, rather then a La Nina!
 


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